Q&A for journalists on personal safety and legal rights at protests

Advice from front-line journalists, lawyers, and behind-the-scenes personal safety experts on how to cover unrest while maintaining your Constitutional rights and your personal safety.

Related resources:

Covering Unrest: When Journalists of Color Become the Target. This important session was led by Martin G. Reynolds, who is the co-executive director of external affairs and funding at the Maynard Institute.

The Committee to Protect Journalists: Civil scenarios from crime scenes to riots can generate unpredictable and dangerous conditions. Journalists need to be mindful of self-protection measures to avoid putting themselves at physical or legal risk.

Building resiliency: What science can teach us, featuring Dr. Steve Southwick of the National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Advanced search techniques, including image search, focused on protest coverage

Advanced backgrounding, with focus on protest coverage

These are stressful times. Being out in the world as a journalist carries an element of risk. But a world without engaged journalists watching over it is risky, too. Our aim is to identify as many risks as we can and take steps to reduce them, prepare for them, and neutralize them if they do arise.

Other useful resources:

How to Safely Cover Street Protests – tip sheet by Judith Matloff

Covering Street Protests – a compilation of reporter-to-reporter guidance

Leading Resilience – a guide for editors and news managers

Reporters Exposed to Traumatic Events – tips for editors and managers

Handling Traumatic Imagery – a tipsheet for managing graphic content

Dealing with Hate Campaigns – a toolkit for journalists and newsrooms targeted


More training on Photography: